Seperation Anxiety

Dogs are conditioned to be part of a pack. In nature they move together and their identities are formed by the pack. When they

come into our homes we become the pack for them and they want to be with us all the time. Unfortunately this is not always

possible for us and so we need to teach them to also be alone. This is a tough one for them. You can easily train a dog to do

tricks but to learn to be alone is a far more difficult challenge for them.

 

Whining, crying, howling, frantically pawing at doors or windows, running around the room and crying when they are left alone are

all common signs of separation anxiety. The typical response of people when this happens is to run back to the room, cuddle the

pup, or start feeling sorry for it. This is the wrong approach. What you end up doing this way is actually reinforcing the anxiety

because the message you are giving the pup is that when you cry it’s a good behavior that is why I run back and cuddle you and

pet you.

 

Here’s what you need to do instead:

 

   

 

Leave the room calmly, without any anxiety and without much fuss.  Don’t start anxiously petting the dog before you leave, or talking to

him excessively. Just get up normally, walk calmly to the door and exit.  

 

Once you have shut the door behind you, wait till the whining starts. Before it accelerates to a pitch of hysteria, re-enter the room and stand

in a calm and confident way and say No, firmly.   

 

Leave the room and repeat exercise.

   

Slowly you will be able to increase the time gap between shutting the door and anxiety setting in. And eventually you should have a very calm

dog .  

 

  

The key is patience, you being calm and feeling confident.

 

If your energy carries pity for the dog, remember your dog is going to be able to read it and it will be much harder for her to learn to calm down.

 

This is a positive exercise for you and your dog and the more positive and calm you are the better and quicker will the results be.