Neutering and Spaying

                                                                                                                                                                         

 

                 Be a Responsible Pet Owner. Neuter and Spay your Pets

 

 

 

  What is Spaying or Neutering?    

 

    Spaying is a general term used to describe the ovariohysterectomy of a female animal. It is a surgical procedure through which the ovaries and the uterus are removed. Neutering is a general term used to describe the castration of a male animal. It is a surgical procedure through which the testicles of the dog are removed. These procedures, performed by a veterinarian, render the animal incapable of reproducing. The term neutering is often used in reference to both genders.

   

What Are the Benefits of Having My Pet Spayed/Neutered? 

 

 

There are hundreds of thousands of dogs languishing in shelters across India because they are unwanted. There is an overpopulation of dogs and more unwanted puppies just add to the already overwhelming burden shelters have to carry. Having your pet spayed/neutered ensures that you wont be adding to this burden.

 

Through neutering, you can help your dog live a happier, healthier, longer life. The life span of a dog is said to increase by almost 30% if he/she is neutered. Spaying a female dog also eliminates the messiness associated with the heat cycle.

 

A long-term benefit of spaying and neutering is improved health for dogs. Spaying females prior to their first heat cycle nearly eliminates the risk of breast cancer, mammary tumors and totally prevents uterine infections and uterine cancer. Spayed females can't develop pyometra, an infection of the uterus that can be quite fatal. Spayed females also tend to have more even temperaments and don't go through the hormone induced mood swings that intact females do. If you have several females living together it can also prevent them from fighting with each other.

 

Neutering of male dogs can prevent certain undesirable sexual behaviors, such as urine marking, humping, male aggression especially towards other male dogs and the urge to roam (Visiting neighbourhood females is a major reason for roaming). They are also less likely to mark their territory by urinating in the house (testosterone is a major force for this kind of dominance related behaviour). If you have more than one pet in your household, all the pets will generally get along better if they are neutered. These behaviour benefits are especially true if you castrate your dog between the age of 6 to 9 months. Neutering males prevents testicular cancer and enlargement of the prostate gland, and greatly reduces their risk for perianal tumors and hernia.

 

Will My Dog Undergo Personality Changes After the Surgery?

 

It takes approximately six months for hormone levels to reduce in the body. There are no overnite mood changes. The personality changes that may result from neutering are for the better. Not being distracted by the instinctual need to find a mate helps your pet stop roaming and decreases aggressive tendencies.

 

 

Won't my dogs get fat and lazy if I neuter/spay them?

 

Exercise is a must for every dog. With proper exercise and a good nutritious meal your dog should be as active as ever. Sometimes dogs do develop a tendency to put on weight but its controllable by adjusting the quantity of food and of course making sure your dog is well exercised.

Neutering of male dogs can prevent certain undesirable sexual behaviors, such as urine marking, humping, male aggression and the urge to roam. If you have more than one pet in your household, all the pets will generally get along better if they are neutered. Neutering of male dogs can prevent certain undesirable sexual behaviors, such as urine marking, humping, male aggression and the urge to roam. If you have more than one pet in your household, all the pets will generally get along better if they are neutered.

   

Isn't it wrong to deprive an animal of the natural right to reproduce? 

 

No, it’s wrong to allow these animals to reproduce millions of unwanted offspring that are eventually killed or land up in shelters because there aren’t enough responsible homes.

 


If I find homes for my pet's litters, then I won't contribute to the problem, right?

 

Wrong. Only a limited number of people want pets. So every home you find for your pet’s offspring takes away a home from a loving animal already at a shelter.


Shouldn't every female pet have at least one litter before being spayed?

 

No. In fact, your pet will be healthier if she never sexually matures.